Jeremy Petch & Andreas Laupacis

Dr. Jeremy Petch is a project manager at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital.  He holds a PhD in Philosophy from York University and a graduate diploma from the Ontario Training Centre in Health Service and Policy Research, specializing in biomedial ethics and health policy.  His doctoral work focused on the intersection of ethics, law and public policy in the regulation of genetic screening technologies.  Jeremy was previously a research associate at the Institute for Work and Health, where he researched the health of the Long Term Care workforce, geographical variation in workplace injury, and the health of very young workers.  Follow Jeremy on Twitter @JeremyPetch Dr. Andreas Laupacis is the Executive Director of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital and a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto. He is a general internist whose interest in health care is driven by his experiences as a consumer, practitioner, researcher and involvement in health care governance. He is currently the Chair of the Board of Health Quality Ontario and a Board Member at Cancer Care Ontario. He holds a Canada Research Chair in Health Policy and Citizen Engagement. He is convinced that the health care system would be better if there is more informed input from citizens. Follow him on Twitter @AndreasLaupacis


Articles and Opinion Pieces by this author

Conflict at the end of life: what happens when doctors and families disagree?

Informed consent to medical treatment is one of the foundational pillars of Canadian medical law and the practice of medicine. Before administering a course of treatment, health care professionals are expected to ensure that their patients understand the benefits and risks of each option and that they voluntarily agree to undergo the chosen therapy. In…

Will more finance reform improve quality in Ontario’s hospitals?

After a decade of focusing on access to health care services, the Ontario government appears to be turning its attention to improving the quality and costs of these services. At the moment, there is considerable variation in how health care is delivered in Ontario’s hospitals, so patients with the same diseases are receiving different qualtiy…

Increasing access to surgery without considering appropriateness leaves patients in the dark

Over the last decade, most Canadian provinces have shortened wait times for many surgical procedures, including hip and knee replacement. However, while provinces have poured resources into improving access, they have paid relatively little attention to measuring outcomes of these surgeries. The result, experts believe, is that some patients may be undergoing surgery when it is not…

Supporting Ontario’s unpaid caregivers

Anne Harrison lives in Huron County with her husband.  For nearly two and half years, her husband was medicated for anxiety and stress he was experiencing at work.  The medication didn’t help.  They didn’t know what was wrong, and worried he might have a brain tumor. In June of 2011, her local family health team,…

Money matters: does ‘pay-for-performance’ improve quality?

In Ontario, new ways of paying doctors have been introduced in an attempt to improve the quality of their services.  One approach is pay-for-performance, which pays doctors for meeting certain treatment goals. However, there is little high quality evidence that pay-for-performance improves the quality of care, and it appears to have had limited impact in…

Alberta driving quality improvement through clinical leadership

Alberta is introducing Strategic Clinical Networks in areas such as mental health and addictions, cancer care, diabetes, obesity and nutrition. These networks are meant to lead clinical practices province-wide, and improve the quality of care, outcomes and costs of health care services. This is an ambitious undertaking which may contain some lessons for Ontario. Alberta’s…