Kathy Hardill

Kathy Hardill is a Primary Care Nurse Practitioner clinic that includes patients whose health is made vulnerable through homelessness, poverty and other risk factors. She has worked in acute and intensive care as well as community nursing. She spent twenty years working with inner city populations providing care to homeless individuals. As a social justice activist she is interested in the social determinants of health and in particular in the effects of poverty on illness and access to health care. Kathy has guest lectured in a variety of settings on reducing income related morbidity and mortality in diverse practice situations. In 2010 she undertook an Advanced Clinical Practice Fellowship supported by the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario on the health and harm reduction needs of rural substance using individuals. Her philosophy of nursing holds that while providing care to individuals “downstream,” one must constantly look “upstream” to determine how to address the systemic barriers which compromise the health of populations.


Articles and Opinion Pieces by this author

Are Health Links targeting the right patients?

One of the priorities of the Ontario government is to develop strategies to reduce the disproportionate amount of health system use, and in particular of acute hospital care, by small sub-groups of people, such as seniors, those with complex chronic health issues or people whose health is complicated by mental health or substance use issues.…

The missing link in overdose prevention

Long-established medical practice supports prescribing pre-loaded syringes of epinephrine to people having severe, life-threatening allergic reactions to allergens such as bee stings, nuts and shellfish. Patients, including children, are taught how to use them and carry them with them at all times in order to administer the drug without delay when they have a reaction.…

What’s wrong with the pink ribbon?

October is “Breast Cancer Awareness” month. Just when you thought there could not be any more pink ribbons in the world, there are. I have never liked the cutesy, little girl symbolism of a pink ribbon to represent breast cancer. I refuse to buy any product sporting a pink ribbon and I do not support…

The false dichotomy of fee cuts

Recently I had a discussion with some physician colleagues about the Ontario Medical Association (OMA) campaign and specifically the principle of communicating non-neutral, political information to our patients. The campaign to which I am referring is that seeking to solicit the support of Ontario patients for physicians who are trying to get the government back…

Nurse practitioners want fair wages – just don’t say the word union

The Ontario government recently tabled a budget which included a two year wage freeze for all public sector employees. This announcement has frustrated some Ontario nurse practitioners, many of whom have not had a wage increase for several years – despite increased responsibilities and significantly enhanced scope of practice. In Ontario, hospital-based NPs generally earn…

Women’s health – how far have we really come?

March 8th, 2012 marked the 101st annual celebration of International Women’s Day.  Originally conceived in Europe in 1911 to draw attention to the struggle for women’s equal participation in society, IWD has become both a day of celebration and an opportunity to highlight the progress still needed to achieve women’s equality.  Certainly, great gains have…

Austerity won’t save health care – fighting poverty will

Recently Ontario Health Minister Deb Matthews made a speech to the Toronto Board of Trade in which she introduced changes to the province’s health care system.  Hmmm – interesting choice of audiences.  The Ontario government is preparing for an upcoming provincial budget. It is widely expected to contain drastic spending cuts as recommended by economist…

“Just say no” to the war on drugs

In recent years, health care has embraced the concept of “evidence based” practice. We incorporate this daily in our diverse work settings. We invoke it when we mentor students. We know, for example, that rigorous control of blood sugar levels in people with diabetes reduces their risk of organ damage – and so we aim…