Jeremy Petch & Joshua Tepper

Dr. Jeremy Petch is a research coordinator at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital.  He holds a PhD in Philosophy from York University and a graduate diploma from the Ontario Training Centre in Health Service and Policy Research, specializing in biomedial ethics and health policy.  His doctoral work focused on the intersection of ethics, law and public policy in the regulation of genetic screening technologies.  Jeremy was previously a research associate at the Institute for Work and Health, where he researched the health of the Long Term Care workforce, geographical variation in workplace injury, and the health of very young workers.  Follow Jeremy on Twitter @JeremyPetch Dr. Joshua Tepper is a family physician the CEO of Health Quality Ontario. He is formerly the Vice President of Education at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and he spent five and a half years as the Assistant Deputy Minister at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Health Human Resources Strategy Division. He led the HealthForceOntario health human resources strategy. He was a senior medical officer for Health Canada, an adjunct scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and a research consultant for the Canadian Institute of Health Information (CIHI). He has a Bachelors degree in Public Policy from Duke University and a Masters of Public Health from Harvard, and completed his executive MBA in June 2011 at the Richard Ivey School of Business. Most important of all he has two gorgeous children Ishai and Adara.


Articles and Opinion Pieces by this author

Ontario Citizens Council: a failed experiment or a success in the making?

Decisions about health policy often involve difficult trade-offs. This is especially true when assessing new health technologies and medications, where funding one item can mean not being able to fund another. These decisions often force policy makers to go beyond scientific considerations of a drug’s effectiveness, and address broader ethical and social considerations. Recognizing that…

Strengthening primary care for child and youth mental health

Chris’ story Chris is a family doctor at a Family Health Team in a Southern Ontario farming community (some details including his name have been changed to protect his and his patients’ identities). He sees many children and youth who have mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety and severe ADHD. While he can care for…

The next challenges for primary care in Ontario

Over the last year, reports have suggested some of Ontario’s new primary care models, which are significantly more expensive than older practice models, have had limited success in improving access and quality. In response, the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care is conducting a review of these models, and had recently instituted a temporary…

Does Ontario have too many doctors?

A growing number of Canadian doctors are underemployed after finishing their training. There are a number of likely causes, including a lack of infrastructure funding, delayed retirements, and a lack of health human resource planning at the national level. After about two decades of strongly worded public headlines and numerous government reports about doctor shortages,…