Karen Born & Terrence Sullivan

  Karen Born is a researcher-writer with the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, focusing her work on projects related to public engagement and education around health care policy. Karen is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) at the University of Toronto. Karen has worked across Ontario facilitating citizen engagement processes for the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, LHINs and hospitals. Karen has an MSc in International Health Policy from the London School of Economics, and an Honours BA in Political Science from McGill University. Follow Karen on Twitter @BornK Dr. Terrence Sullivan was President and CEO of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) from 2001-2011. From 1993 to 2001, Dr. Sullivan held the position of President of the Institute for Work & Health (IWH). He has held senior roles in the Ontario Ministries of Health, Intergovernmental Affairs and Cabinet Office. He served two successive Premiers Ontario as Executive Director of the Premier's Council on Health Strategy from 1989-1991, including a period of time as Deputy Minister. He is an active behavioral scientist with research and practice interests in cancer prevention and health system performance. He holds faculty appointments in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. His current commitments include roles as the Vice Chair of the Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion and the independent chair of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technology in Health.


Articles and Opinion Pieces by this author

Perspective on payment negotiation for Ontario’s doctors

The Ontario Medical Association (OMA) and Ministry of Health and Long Term Care negotiate fee schedules on a four year basis.  This year, the process has garnered a great deal of attention as negotiations broke down, and the Ministry of Health unilaterally imposed fee reductions in some areas.  Understanding the history of bargaining between doctors…

Does more care mean better care?

A recent study found that Ontario hospitals that used more resources and spent more money had better outcomes for acutely ill patients than hospitals that used fewer resources.  These findings go against a previous study that looked at the same question in the United States and found that more resources didn’t impact outcomes.  A better…

Are Canadians too salty?

Salt intake is difficult for individuals to control, because more than three quarter of the salt we consume comes from processed foods, like bread, deli meats and dairy products. Most Canadians are consuming more than double the daily recommended amount of salt. While there is a link between salt consumption and heart disease and stroke,…

The future of the federal health transfer

With the expiry of the Health Accord in 2014 looming, the debate about the role of the federal government in paying for health care is once again taking centre stage.   The School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto hosted a roundtable on the future of how the federal government transfers…

The influence of politics & the public on research funding in Canada

The recent controversy about a new treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) has raised questions about the role of patients and politicians in determining health research priorities. In the past, the scientific community has generally determined what research is conducted. However the public is increasingly demanding that they be involved in setting research priorities – the…

What’s next for tobacco control in Ontario?

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in Ontario, and is costly to the health care system. From the 1990s into the past decade, Ontario made significant progress in reducing smoking rates. However, smoking rates are no longer declining as steeply. More aggressive action needs to be taken if Ontario wants to…

LHINs and the governance of Ontario’s health care system

In many provinces across Canada the authority and governance of health care has been moved to regional authorities, based on the belief that local authorities can better integrate and coordinate services, and contain costs. Ontario created 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) in 2006, with the mandate to plan, fund and integrate health care services…

How should hospital doctors be paid?

Doctors are a significant portion of the costs for the health care system. In 2009, almost a quarter of Ontario’s health care budget was spent on paying doctors. Most doctors who work in hospitals are not paid by the hospital directly, but by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan, which pays doctors for each procedure and clinical service.…

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing comes to Canada

Genetic profiles are being offered directly to consumers online for relatively reasonable sums of money. These websites are not yet widely known to Canadian consumers.  Doctors and the public need to be educated to better understand what the results of these tests mean.  E-commerce has exploded over the past decade, and now you can buy…