Stephanie Aleluya

Illustrator

Stephanie is a 17 year old student from Toronto, Canada. After high school she plans on pursuing a career in the medical field. She enjoys working with acrylic, oil and watercolour paint and has experience in graphic design.

2350 Contributions

Enough with the harassment: How to deal with anti-vax cults

The anti-vaxxers who protested outside of my own home because I'm a medical officer of health demonstrate cultish behaviour. Here's how we counter them.

by Gabriel Dobson

How I have been lonely during COVID and benefited from It

While COVID has progressed we have had the need to wear masks to slow or prevent the spread of COVID. The good thing about this is that while wearing a mask no one expects me to show emotions so I can just sit there in silence.

by Craig Kazakoff

How the Pandemic Affected Me

Because we are into two years of this pandemic and I'm so on the verge of losing my cool I can't contain it any longer and I bet you would all agree with me because you want this all to end.

by Joe Vipond Malgorzata (Gosia) Gasperowicz Wing Kar Li Michelle Brandenburg

Alberta government’s failure means we must protect ourselves

The Alberta government has given up on protecting us from COVID-19. But even though our government may no longer care about us, we can still care about each other. Here are ten tips on how to stay safe.

by Sophia Ikura Lydia-Joi Marshall Nolan D’Souza

Fear of the unknown: Parents want information and transparency when deciding to vaccinate their children

Through interviews and focus groups held with parents of kids 5 to 11 years old, Health Commons Solutions Lab learned about their motivations, beliefs and questions when it comes to vaccinating their kids – and what resources they need.

by Jeremy Cygler

Family member’s undiagnosed illness gives physician new patient perspective

When patients have strange, unidentified illnesses, physicians often focus more on finding a diagnosis than managing symptoms. When a close family member struggled with such an illness, I saw the importance of addressing patient suffering earlier on.

by Will Falk

Twenty years of talk is enough: Digital tools like e-prescribing must become a core part of our health-care system

When the pandemic started and social distancing necessitated a switch to virtual care almost overnight, our digital health-care system struggled and sometimes failed entirely. This broken system must end now. Here's how we can fix it.

by Anne Borden King

‘Focus on the tooth and the person’: The movement for trauma-informed dentistry

People joke that they don't like going to the dentist, but for some, a trip to the dentist can actually trigger past traumas. The trauma-informed dentistry movement is trying to make dentists' offices places where vulnerable patients feel safe.

by Junayd Hussain Noor Al-Kaabi

We need to do more: Advocating for refugee health after arrival in Canada

Canada is considered a “world destination” for refugees, but are we doing enough to support their unique health needs?

by Mary-Kay Whittaker

Despite (or because of?) pandemic, students are flocking to nursing

Despite pandemic-induced grueling work schedules and stressful work environments, nursing programs have never been as popular. In Ontario alone, applications to registered nursing (RN) programs rose 17.6 per cent from 2020 to 2021.

by Rehona Zamani

The fight for women’s autonomy must include those who wear the hijab

It's a battle to wake up and choose the hijab each day. I truly believe in this aspect of my faith, but the fear and experience of harassment and discrimination is a form of oppression I endure. I know this is a feeling shared by my peers in medicine.

by Noah Ivers

Do we have the political will to ensure effective, equitable health care?

COVID-19 has exposed the longstanding frailty of our health-care system. The truth is that every flu season, our hospitals burst at the seams. Hard-working health-care workers have held the system together so far. It’s past time to create the system they deserve.

by Luiza Radu

The situation is dire but not hopeless: More must be done to protect our health-care workers

COVID-19 has created unprecedented burnout levels among health-care workers, causing serious mental health crises. The situation is dire – but not hopeless. We need a multifaceted approach to alleviating burnout. Here's what such an approach looks like.

by Kieran Quinn

Omicron may be less severe but ‘let it rip’ is not the answer

Some argue that since Omicron is less severe than previous variants and all Canadians will likely be infected eventually, why not “let it rip” and be done with it? But there are three fundamental problems with this approach.

by Marianne Apostolides

Lessons learned, mistakes repeated: From HIV/AIDS to COVID-19

Many infectious disease practitioners pivoted from HIV to COVID when the pandemic struck. Now, some of them are sharing their views on what we’ve learned, where we’ve repeated mistakes, and how we can move forward.

by Sahil Gupta

Granola bars, gift cards and phone chargers: The little extras nurses carry to get colleagues and patients through tough times

Nurses hold the health-care system together, even as many are suffering from burnout and leaving the profession. In this photo-essay, nurses speak about the little things they carry with them to stay motivated and connect with patients and colleagues.

by Sarah Newbery

Shortage of physicians, support systems puts health care in northern Ontario in jeopardy

The holistic style of community care that is the backbone of health care in rural northern Ontario is in jeopardy. If we care about equity, those in northern Ontario must have equitable access to the opportunity to live and die well in their communities.

by Stephanie Ragganandan Karen Lawford

Challenging oppressive maternity health care in Canada

Improving health care must begin by recognizing the interconnected webs of colonization woven into all health-care systems in Canada. A good place to start would be at the beginning – with maternity care and birth.

by Colin Furness

Colin Furness

We may need to close schools for short periods of time when the spread of COVID-19 gets out of control, since doing so decreases community mobility and, by extension, transmission. We should also be wary of the narrative that schools are not significant sites of transmission, which might be more politically advantageous than scientifically accurate.

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