Stephanie Aleluya

Illustrator

Stephanie is a 17 year old student from Toronto, Canada. After high school she plans on pursuing a career in the medical field. She enjoys working with acrylic, oil and watercolour paint and has experience in graphic design.

2479 Contributions
by Darren Cargill

Palliative care (still) in need of better PR and a new spokesperson

Palliative care has an image problem. We need to find someone who can get the message across to the thousands of Canadians who could benefit from a palliative approach to care and those who care for them.

by Sabina Vohra-Miller

What we can learn from the evolution of guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic

The only absolute in science is that there are no absolutes. Throughout the pandemic, recommendations have changed based on new data. For the public, this may come across as flip-flopping, but in actuality, it is simply that we are making the best decisions possible in the current context.

by Graham Dickson

How to deal with ‘wicked problems’

This month’s Top Three focuses on the "wicked problems" spurred on by the network of health and social issues created by the pandemic. Addressing these issues will require leadership focused on solutions through a systems-based lens.

by Erin Ariss

Ontario’s health-care system is failing women. Will the Ford government step up?

If we want to ensure an equitable Ontario, we need a government that recognizes the contributions of the many women workers providing health-care services to the people who live and work here.

by Michelle Cohen

Gender segregation, pay inequity. Understanding the ‘pink-collar’ tier in medicine

Understanding the history of health care’s gender segregation, the basis for today’s “pink collar” tier of female-dominated specialties, could help current efforts to improve pay equity in medicine.

by Darren Cargill

On fathers: Paying tribute to those in my life and career

My job gives me an interesting perspective. The simplest lesson I have learned is this: At the end of life, it is not what we have done that we remember most, but it is the things we did not do that we regret.

by Sandor J. Demeter

The dangers of ‘political capture’ for clinicians and scientists

The influence of politics on scientific endeavours has resulted in polarization and politicization of pandemic related issues.

by Inori Roy

Medical council considering alternatives to ‘outdated’ licensing exam

The MCCQE II, a Medical Council of Canada licensing exam, is considered by some critics to be an outdated and unnecessary burden. Temporarily paused by the pandemic, the MCC will soon decide whether and how the exam will return - and what role it will play in the changing world of medical education.

by Rachel Lebovic

Why I talk about mental illness when stigma tells me I shouldn’t

There is stigma surrounding the illness that nearly took my life and it will be hard for people to look beyond my past. But we will never break the stigma by continuing to give into it in remaining silent.

by Vivek Govardhanam

Call the ‘brown doctor’: A case for language-sensitive delivery of health care

In a multicultural city like Toronto, it only makes ethical and financial sense to provide language-sensitive care in hospitals. Without it, culturally sensitive communication is incomplete.

by Darren Cargill

No need for super heroes. What we need is the will to fix our health-care system

Panels have been stuck. Articles and reports have been written. But Canadians will have to stay informed and involved if we want to improve our health-care system.

by Neal Belluzzo

Physician Service Agreement yet again leaves the most vulnerable in the shadows

Somewhere along the line, we’ve managed to create barriers to health care that have caused us to deviate from the vision of Tommy Douglas.

by Inori Roy

Sharing is caring – app aims to fill gaps in health-data infrastructure

Vaccination records in Canada have long been fragmented and decentralized, dragging the country's pandemic response capabilities with it. The digital immunization records sharing app, CANImmunize, takes a stab at filling these vital gaps in Canada's health data infrastructure.

by Eddy Lang Arnav Agarwal

Overdiagnosis: Good intentions gone bad

Overdiagnosis is a problem that's been recognized for decades, but in the last 10 years research has proven that early detection does not always mean better outcomes. Overdiagnosis can sometimes cause physical, psychological or financial harm. But there are things that both physicians and patients can do to help prevent it.

by Catherine Varner

Omicron and medical conferences – a balancing of risks

Large, in-person medical conferences can be risky in the Omicron era. Yet, proponents say these risks can be mitigated, and resuming in-person learning and networking are necessary to advance medicine and support a profession at its breaking point.

by Inori Roy

‘Data is powerful’: Demographic questionnaire adds transparency to Match Day

This year, the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) with the support of Dalhousie University, rolled out its pilot questionnaire to collect much-needed demographic data on residency placements across the country. Information gathered on race and Indigeneity, immigration, ability, gender, sexual orientation and household income of students could go a long way in ensuring equity among med students.

by Darren Cargill

There is no debate – Patient Medical Homes are the way to go

The Patient's Medical Home is a vision for the future of family practice in Canada: One that focuses on comprehensive, coordinated, and continuing care for populations through a family physician working with health care teams.

by Jill Oliver Angel Petropanagos Megan Bailey Babitha Paulose Zachary Walbaum Mark Handelman Paula Chidwick

COVID-related beliefs and challenges for informed consent

Can patients who deny the existence or nature of COVID have the capacity to consent to the treatment of COVID-19? The answer could determine who will decide what happens to a patient.

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