Alykhan Abdulla

Contributor

Alykhan Abdulla is a comprehensive family doctor working in Manotick, Ontario, member of the Ontario Medical Foundation Board, Bruyere Foundation Board, College of Family Physicians of Canada and Director for Longitudinal Leadership Curriculum at the University of Ottawa Undergraduate Medical Education. 

6 Contributions
by Matthew Schurter Alykhan Abdulla

Dear consultant doctor: An open letter from a couple of family physicians

In family practice, we’re struggling. Many of us are burned out from trying to be all things to all patients and using bandages to solve frank hemorrhaging.

by Alykhan Abdulla Matthew Schurter

Dr. Pharmacist?

Pharmacists can prescribe medications for certain ailments in eight provinces with Ontario about to follow suit. But while pharmacists knowledge of medications is invaluable, are they diagnosticians?

by Alykhan Abdulla

The need for family medicine

This optimistic article looks at the exceptional nature of family medicine based on these key words: longitudinal; relationship- and patient-focused; and comprehensive. They are foundational to supporting and serving everyone equitably.

by Alykhan Abdulla

Can we improve health care for all with only the empty public purse?

In a follow-up to his recent article on the day in the life of a family physician, Dr. Alykhan Abdulla discusses the knee-jerk reactions to privatization following Ontario's announcement that it would increase publicly funded surgeries at private clinics.

by Alykhan Abdulla

A day in a life of a family physician

Family medicine has been in the news lately, with accounts of shortages and medical graduates shunning the practice. Many believe family medicine is about infections, prescription renewals and referrals to specialists. Perhaps by sharing the details of a day in a life in family medicine, then my colleagues can either substantiate, educate or commiserate with my experience.

by Alykhan Abdulla

Why would anyone want to be a family doctor?

Let’s face it – fewer and fewer medical graduates want to be family doctors. But why? Finances, respect in the field and the challenges of family medicine could all play a part.

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