MAiD

26 articles
by Meera Mahendiran

Mental health and MAID: An ongoing challenge

Parliament is looking into offering MAiD to people whose only underlying condition is a mental illness. But this might be premature. After all, shouldn't we first improve mental health care in Canada?

by Larry W. Chambers Madeleine Smith

New MAiD legislation calls for the wise words of a pioneer

The new MAiD law should provoke reflection about our own attitudes toward death. A place to start is a wise 12-minute video produced by a prominent geriatrician shortly before his own medically assisted death.

by Gali Katznelson

MAiD debate must be paused until we have dealt with COVID-19

Rather than rushing to amend our Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) law, Parliament should be focused on expanding access to social services.

by Peter Allatt

The timing could hardly be worse

You want to introduce fundamental change to a controversial practice during a pandemic? Bill C-7 will become law while every healthcare organization in the country is swamped by the worst crisis in living memory.

by Christina Sinding

Last rights: Connecting the space between palliative care and MAiD

For my Mom, palliative care and MAiD unfolded gracefully together. My family’s experience is one among many that might prompt Canada’s palliative care organizations to reconsider their relationship to MAiD

by Dianne Godkin

The MAiD 10-day waiting period: is it doing more harm than good?

Three years post legislation, it is time to reflect on whether the 10-day waiting period is an effective mechanism for confirming that a wish is enduring.

by Lucas Vivas Pascal Bastien

Expanding MAiD criteria could irreversibly harm the most vulnerable

Since most MAiD requests stem from concerns over autonomy and control, we must ask ourselves if supporting the expansion of MAiD for a few justifies exposing an ever-increasing number of vulnerable patients to its irreversible harms.

by Kieran Quinn

Determining who gets to access Medical Assistance in Dying is all of our responsibility

In relying on our judicial system to decide who has the right to access MAiD as a means to relieve intolerable suffering, we are delaying important decisions on how to deliver high-quality end-of-life care to all Canadians.

by Christopher Guiliano Claudia Hanni Sheliza Halani James Downar

An Ounce of Prevention: Pantoprazole in the Intensive Care Unit and Aspirin for Primary Prevention in Diabetes

by Noam Berlin Zeeshan Ansari Seema Marwaha

Should Canada introduce advance requests for MAID?

Ultimately, ending someone’s life who cannot actively consent to it at that moment, says Wales, “is something to think about very seriously.”

by Andreas Laupacis

We like to talk about “a good death.” But how often does this really happen?

A cardiologist told me that it is important that people have a good death. I thought of two patients who had recently died. Would they say they experienced a good death?

by Ralph Lewis

Depression and MAID: Terminally ill patients are often depressed. But that doesn’t mean they’re incompetent.

Depression biases a person’s outlook, but bias is not the same as mental incompetence. Doctors must balance protecting patients in vulnerable mental states from exercising poor judgment against respecting their autonomy.

by Kieran Quinn Michael Fralick James Downar Emily Hughes Sheliza Halani

Summer Replay: Calling Home – Accuracy of The Surprise Question, Medical Assistance in Dying, and SGLT2 Inhibitors & DKA

by Kieran Quinn Michael Fralick James Downar Emily Hughes Sheliza Halani

Calling Home: Accuracy of The Surprise Question, Medical Assistance in Dying, and SGLT2 Inhibitors & DKA

by Vanessa Milne Christopher Doig Maureen Taylor

Combining organ donation and medical assistance in death: considering the ethical questions

by Michel Bilodeau

Governments shouldn’t force faith-based hospitals to perform medical assistance in dying

The government of Ontario’s decision to protect faith-based institutions makes a lot of sense. It is now up to government to ensure that all those in need have access to medically assisted death.

by Jocelyn Downie

Ontario’s faith-based exemptions allow and mask barriers to medical assistance in dying

The Ontario government is demonstrating it will privilege the interests of faith-based healthcare institutions at the expense of patients who, by definition, are experiencing enduring and intolerable suffering.

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