Racism

33 articles
by Stephanie Ragganandan

The diabetes epidemic in South Asian communities will continue until we shift to prevention

In Canada, South Asian communities are at a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared to the general population. As a result, South Asian populations experience significant morbidity and mortality.

by Suzanne Shoush

On this Orange Shirt Day: What has changed?

Today marks our second National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. It has been two years since the death of Joyce Echaquan; 16 months since the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc community confirmed long-held knowledge that hundreds of little children were buried in unmarked graves on the grounds. Since then, the haunting reality of more than a thousand additional radar “pings,” with each ping confirming the body of a little child lying in an unmarked grave, on the very grounds of the school they were forced to attend. So much has happened . . . but what has changed?

by Anjali Bhayana

Malnourishment by design

Colonial attitudes and policies, now recognized as powerful social determinants of health, have led to mass hunger and preventable diseases.

by Atefeh Mohammadi Vaidhehi Veena Sanmugananthan Junayd Hussain

The Nobel Prize, and representation in science

The Nobel Prize is one of the most coveted accolades in academia, but diverse individuals are being left out as awardees. We hope that scientists from underrepresented communities also will feel as if their work will be recognized fairly.

by Riley Meade

Tackling racism in Canadian health care: University offers first master’s program in Black health

Black Canadians have poorer health outcomes and are less likely to obtain health-care services compared to other groups. Poverty, unemployment, racism and discrimination, increase the risk of illness and interfere with timely and unprejudiced treatment. A new University of Toronto program is working toward eliminating discrimination and its adverse effects on health care.

by Inori Roy

‘Data is powerful’: Demographic questionnaire adds transparency to Match Day

This year, the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) with the support of Dalhousie University, rolled out its pilot questionnaire to collect much-needed demographic data on residency placements across the country. Information gathered on race and Indigeneity, immigration, ability, gender, sexual orientation and household income of students could go a long way in ensuring equity among med students.

by Meghan McGee

To tackle food insecurity, school adds hunting and fishing to reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic

Faced with rampant food insecurity in the Eel Ground First Nation, New Brunswick, one elementary school principal started the Kelulk Mijipjewe food program to provide nutritious meals and teach students about Indigenous food culture.

by Meghan McGee

‘As a matter of policy, kids were hungry in residential schools’: The dark history of Canada’s food guide

Canada's Food Guide has its roots in controversial experiments conducted on Indigenous children and adults in the 1940's and 50's.

by Idil Abdillahi Anne Rucchetto

College must act to ensure equitable health-care outcomes for women, marginalized communities

Differences in surgical outcomes between men and women may be part of a larger gendered public health crisis.

by Nili Kaplan-Myrth

‘We will not hide out of fear’: Open letter speaks out against harassment

Physicians and other health-care workers have been subject to harassment and intimidation for doing their day-to-day work during the pandemic explains Dr. Kaplan-Myrth, who recently penned an open letter asserting why health professionals should not hide out of fear of violence from hate-fueled convoys.

by Rehona Zamani

The fight for women’s autonomy must include those who wear the hijab

It's a battle to wake up and choose the hijab each day. I truly believe in this aspect of my faith, but the fear and experience of harassment and discrimination is a form of oppression I endure. I know this is a feeling shared by my peers in medicine.

by Stephanie Ragganandan Karen Lawford

Challenging oppressive maternity health care in Canada

Improving health care must begin by recognizing the interconnected webs of colonization woven into all health-care systems in Canada. A good place to start would be at the beginning – with maternity care and birth.

by Rachel Watts

Community advocate ‘unrelenting in making good trouble’

Angela Robertson, executive director of Parkdale-Queen West Community Health Centre in Toronto, is a determined advocate for homeless, racialized and disadvantaged communities. We're profiling her as a Pillars of the Pandemic honouree.

by Tim Li

To eliminate food insecurity, we must dismantle anti-Black racism

A recent study broke down how race is connected to factors that lead to food insecurity. The findings point to anti-Black racism as the underlying reason for the disparity in food insecurity between Black and white Canadians.

by Miranda Caley

‘We deserve better’: Health centre director advocates for marginalized communities

Cheryl Prescod is the executive director of a community health centre that was on the front lines of vaccinating the inhabitants of a disadvantaged area of Toronto. We're profiling her as a Pillars of the Pandemic honouree.

by Seema Marwaha Sabina Vohra-Miller Ripudaman Singh Minhas

Breaking the cycle of racism and bias in health care

COVID-19 has laid bare racial disparities in health. Three medical professionals talk about the structural racism in health care they have seen during the pandemic – and what needs to be done to address it.

by Anne Borden King

Why Peter Bryce’s legacy still matters today

Physician John O'Connor received an award honouring the legacy of Peter Bryce, a government doctor who sounded the alarm over the high death toll in residential schools. Who has the courage to be the next?

by Rachel Watts

Recent stem cell transplant raises hope for sickle cell cure

A recent stem cell transplant has cured a man of sickle cell disease, raising hopes among patient advocates. However, they emphasize that, for now, improving care for most patients requires removing racist barriers in health care.

by Juweiriya Ahmed Kevin Jia Qi Chen Dorothy Qian Laura Diamond

‘It’s hell for inmates in there’: COVID precautions in prisons are worsening mental health

COVID-19 precautions in prisons, such as extended lockdowns and reduced visits, are taking a serious toll on prisoners' mental health

by Yuliya Rackal Nadha Hassen

Tackling racism in health care

Health-care institutions must reflect critically on whether they're ready to make the commitment necessary to do antiracist work by investing time and money to bring about systemic change. Anything less is performative.

1 of 2