Evidence Based Medicine

63 articles
by Karla Machlab

What is ‘normal’? Lab-based inequity in hematology

Inappropriate reference ranges are a significant issue in various areas of medicine and perpetuate systemic racism.

by Maddi Dellplain

Telegraph hit job a prime example of how not to report on drug policy

The Telegraph story depicts Vancouver's Downtown Eastside in a way that maximizes the harm done to their most vulnerable sources. But as journalists, we don't need to punch down to do our jobs.

by Neeloufar Grami

Staying ahead of the curve – fentanyl, xylazine and the growing syndemic

Xylazine and other contaminants have made their way into the illicit drug supply complicating overdose response. We cannot afford to sit back and watch what happens.

by Kathleen Finlay

It’s time to make compassion more relevant in our world

A generative compassion approach looks at the bigger picture and proactively asks the question: What more needs to be done to prevent more harm from occurring?

by Maddi Dellplain

Vaping: A valuable harm reduction tool or a public health concern? Experts weigh in

What is Canada to do about e-cigarettes? Does vaping pose a legitimate public health threat or is it a far safer alternative for those who would otherwise be vulnerable to the known harms of cigarettes?

by Serena Eagland Corey Ranger Patty Wilson

Fears of exposure to illicit drugs in public places based on politics, not facts

Health-care providers deserve to have a safe workplace, and this includes accurate information about their environmental risks. But the dangers of second-hand inhalation of illicit substances have been highly political rather than rooted in evidence.

by Allison Dunning

‘Thank you for sharing. Do you have a plan?’ Outdated policies preventing peer supporters from saving lives

Peer supporters are ready and able to support people with experiences relating to death and dying – we just need organizational policies to get with the times.

by Joe Vipond

Droplet or airborne? WHO says it’s ‘through the air’ 

The WHO is slowly moving forward on airborne transmission. But language changes seem forced, unnecessary and only seem to benefit those who were unable to use the word "airborne" early in the pandemic.

by Maxime Lê

Patient partners add value to health research

Involving patients and caregivers in research can make research more relevant. So, how can patients and caregivers partner on a project?

by Kathleen Ross

Access to family doctor crucial step in weeding out fact from fiction

Everyone deserves access to accurate, evidence-based health information. A robust primary care system helps patients weed out fact from fiction, build trusting relationships with providers and ultimately live healthier lives.

by Maddi Dellplain

Setting the record straight: Medical experts debunk the biggest myths in their field

These days, it's hard to know what to believe. We polled a panel of health experts on the most pervasive misinformation in their specialty and asked them to set the record straight.

by Maddi Dellplain

Waging war on our immune systems: Immunologist explains the horrifying toll of measles

Immunologist Samira Jeimy breaks down the horrifying toll that measles takes on our bodies and communities - and what can be done to stop it.

by James Dickinson Harminder Singh Roland Grad

Why screening guideline committees should not include ‘experts’ as voting members

The challenge to those who do not like the Canadian Task Force recommendations is this: Can you provide or research the new evidence required to show how a different policy is better?

by Anne Borden King Michelle Cohen

Increase in online ADHD diagnoses for kids poses ethical questions

During the pandemic, Ontario swapped out in-clinic ADHD assessment and prescriptions for a virtual care model. Should we continue allowing it for kids?

by Jason M. Lo Hog Tian Shyamaly Vasuthevan James Watson

Tackling HIV stigma: Why it’s important and what needs to be done

Experiences of HIV-related stigma are still incredibly high in Canada. However, given the continued lack of understanding about how stigma makes people feel unwell, it is a challenge to design solutions to reduce its impact.

by Simone Lebeuf

Please leave politicians out of the exam room. Proposed changes to transgender health policies set a dangerous precedent

Government insertion into medical care is a dangerous step for all Canadians. While it may seem limited to a small minority of people, it sets a precedent that health care is subject to the whims of the current political party. Medical decision-making should be left to the patient and the provider.

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