Mental Health

192 articles:

Trusting my mind again after psychosis failed it

My illness is not your adjective. If you are acting unhinged, you are not “psychotic.” If you’re feeling unstable, you’re not “bipolar.” In the same way, if you like things neatly arranged, you’re not “so OCD.”

by Junayd Hussain Vaidhehi Veena Sanmugananthan Noor Al-Kaabi

Health-care behind bars: Equity and accountability in Canada’s correctional services

The Canada Health Act governs publicly funded health-care insurance and protects Canadians’ right of access to universal health care. However, contrary to popular belief, these rights do not apply to federal prisoners, nor are they covered by provincial plans.

by Maggie Hulbert Adriana Di Stefano Gina Nicoll

Fund vital mental health interventions, not more policing

Mental health crises have been inextricably linked to policing and criminal justice. But a mental health crisis is exactly that – a health issue, not a criminal one.

by Kathleen Finlay

Making compassion the new normal

Here’s another supply-chain challenge created by the coronavirus: the delivery of more compassion by our governments and public institutions. It's time our major institutions committed to acting compassionately.

by Elena Rusu Lucie Péléja Marc Albert

ADHD in females: Outdated criteria leading to missed diagnoses

I have ADHD, but it took nearly my whole life to receive a proper diagnosis. Unfortunately, I am not alone – females with this condition often go either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, since ADHD diagnostic criteria are male-oriented.

by Gabriel Dobson

How I have been lonely during COVID and benefited from It

While COVID has progressed we have had the need to wear masks to slow or prevent the spread of COVID. The good thing about this is that while wearing a mask no one expects me to show emotions so I can just sit there in silence.

by Craig Kazakoff

How the Pandemic Affected Me

Because we are into two years of this pandemic and I'm so on the verge of losing my cool I can't contain it any longer and I bet you would all agree with me because you want this all to end.

by Anne Borden King

‘Focus on the tooth and the person’: The movement for trauma-informed dentistry

People joke that they don't like going to the dentist, but for some, a trip to the dentist can actually trigger past traumas. The trauma-informed dentistry movement is trying to make dentists' offices places where vulnerable patients feel safe.

by Luiza Radu

The situation is dire but not hopeless: More must be done to protect our health-care workers

COVID-19 has created unprecedented burnout levels among health-care workers, causing serious mental health crises. The situation is dire – but not hopeless. We need a multifaceted approach to alleviating burnout. Here's what such an approach looks like.

by Anne Borden King

As the pandemic landscape shifts, what about the children?

Life hasn’t gone back to normal – it’s moved to another new normal. So how can we support our kids in this new phase of the pandemic? One way is to ease up on academic pressures. Instead of getting our kids caught up, we need to catch up with our kids.

Restoring dignity: A teenager’s insights into inpatient psychiatric admission

As a 19-year-old with bipolar disorder, I waited eight hours in the ER for a doctor. My brain may not have been bleeding, but I felt like my brain was on fire. Here's what I learned about improving care for patients experiencing a mental health crisis.

by Meena

Looking on the bright side

I took this time to realize what self-care actually is. From the beginning of the pandemic all the way until September 2020, I grew as a person. Being away from people allowed me to focus on myself. Since I barely had anything to do, I picked up a handful of different hobbies, which before I could never see myself doing.

by Mackenzie Campbell

Blank 67

It’s been over 500 days since I held someone and not just someone; anyone / this world filled with change / and I'm having a hard time catching up / faces behind masks hiding away from the pain of our reality yet we grow older / grow bolder / and grow in our separate ways without growing apart

by Nivriti Bajwa

Did I just have a dream?

Spring’s the season, but grey’s the hue, / It feels like animals trapped in a zoo! / Stuck in our homes just like glue, / We shall live through history, who knew?

by Olivia Barbosa

Self-reflection during COVID-19

I now look back at COVID and look at it in a more positive light. I reconnected with some old friends of mine that I would've never stayed in contact with, my mental health improved and I learned a lot about myself. I now appreciate the little things a lot more.

by Sean Chen

Passing seasons

While news reports blared the newest case counts and the lives lost, I was trying to gain traction in the ever-deteriorating and demanding world of online learning. From “you’re muted” to “sorry, my wifi cut out,” I realized that this was the new “normal.” With no recovery in sight, I realized the things I missed the most, were the ones I cherished the least.

by Keren Vince

Who knew

Who knew I would miss the simple smile of a stranger walking by me at the grocery store. Who knew I would miss that snarky side-eye by a random person judging me as I walked past them at the mall. Who knew I would miss those little kids who would stick their tongues out at me and giggle. I didn’t.

by Stacie Smith

We must help post-secondary students thrive, not just survive

Preparing to graduate from Dalhousie University last spring was an extremely stressful time of uncertainty for me; classes were switched online quickly and the fear of not being able to graduate on time was a reality.

by Katherine van Kampen

Heroes: The word we use to keep health-care professionals complacent

We health-care workers are not heroes – we are just people trying to do our best in our jobs despite the stones thrown at us. Hero-worship of health-care workers keeps us complacent despite the stacked battle ahead of us.

by Monica Kidd

Moral injury: An emerging legal field spurred by the pandemic?

During the pandemic, health-care professionals have suffered "moral injury." This has caught the attention of personal injury lawyers, who are now exploring moral injury: what it is, who’s at risk, how to treat it – and how it might be litigated.

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