Can a sugar tax help solve our obesity problem?


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11 comments

  1. David Siscoe

    So we, the tax payers currently SUBSIDIZE corn farmers to the tune of 1 billion dollars annually. Simply put our tax dollars provide the corn syrup used in 100% of the crap products contributing to obesity.

    Because the tax payers are CLEARLY unaware, many may think THIS to be a good idea. But the real proposal is let’s tax the taxpayer on the already subsidized tax dollars…

    Simply put…JUST HOW DUMB ARE THE TAXPAYERS?

    Likely, not so bright as many will THINK this to be a good idea but in the end it’s just a thinly veiled ADDITIONAL tax grab.

  2. Chris Bonnett

    This is an interesting and compelling case for public health to develop a comprehensive sugar strategy. However, I don’t have a lot of confidence Health Canada or PHAC will make that a priority. It seems that governments rarely lead anything…just look at the time and human cost before asbestos could be banned, next year.

    One minor error: First hyperlink indicates it is 40% of Canadians who were overweight or obese in 2013, not just obese.

  3. Bob Inglis

    Please stop blaming People for obesity and blame sugar !

    You mentioned 4-10 people are obese , so 60% of people are at normal bmi and are not obese ,it’s probable not realistic.
    Most type 1 diabetics are not obese and a majority of type 2 have onset or pre-insulin deficiency . Realistically obesity comes wth far more consequences wth low income , genetics etc! Yes we need more quality food accessibility for fresh food fruits and veggies & activity

    We need the ability to reach our goals !

    Sugary drinks & sweets are already taxed to death and the consequence again falls on our lower income bracket which I for one wanted a cold drink! Pop or Milk or Juice all have a high content of sugar
    Yes Pop the most sugar ! But the cheapest !
    We need our Politicians & Policy Health Care Advisors to tell the manufactors pay up to our health care funds like cigarettes ! It’s a drug they want us to think it’s ok to consume wth flashy ads and commercials.

    Don’t blame the people and put more tax on 99% of us and the 1% rich company’s keep collecting

    Tax them or tell them stop wth the influx of sugar reduce the amount or be fined all funds directly to the health & wellness .

    As a type1 30yrs and a islet transplant recipient 7 years insulin independence yea !

    My thoughts

    • Carmen

      I agree, more accessibility to cheaper and quality fruits, veges, lean meats – healthier eating does cost more at times plus more prep when food is all fresh and you put it together. In this society, prepared and manufactured foods, especially those that are cheap which contain high carbs and fats are within budget for most. These days, some people do not even know meal prep; parents seem not to have the time to show the kids and unless the kids have courses at school, they don’t even know how to prep a healthy meal, or how to encourage healthy eating. Grab ‘n go meals, sweet treats, or just too much of a good thing and not enough movement contributes to obesity. You have people sitting in front of computers for very long lengths of time because it is their job or they game or socialize via computer (so they don’t move enough at times); to lower obesity really is each person’s ability to change their way of thinking. You may not be able to change the diabetes, my family has a really strong genetic component even in the really thin people. However, you can improve lifestyle and decrease obesity which has psychological and/or a socioeconomic variables dependent on the individual’s situation, not a matter of taxing more on sweets.

  4. Janice Macdonald

    Thank you for your clear overview on this issue which is consistent with Dietitians of Canada’s position on Taxation of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages which follows and is available on our website at http://www.dietitians.ca/taxation.

    It is the position of Dietitians of Canada that an excise tax of at least 10-20% be applied to sugar-sweetened beverages sold in Canada given the negative impact of these products on the health of the population and the viability of taxation as a means to reduce consumption. For the greatest impact, taxation measures should be combined with other policy interventions such as increasing access to healthy foods while decreasing access to unhealthy foods in schools, daycares and recreation facilities; restrictions on the marketing of foods and beverages to children; and effective, long term educational initiatives.

    • KARL PEREIRA

      The tax has worked in every place it has been applied. worked in philadelphia, hungary, france, and mexico.

  5. Joan Nercantini

    I don’t think a tax will solve the probelm. Healthy eating will. The Canada Food Guidelnes must be changed . I wrote this lettr to the CDA yesterday asI was shocked to find out that the Canadian Sugar Institute support the Dietitians of Canada
    http://www.dietitians.ca/…/Past-sponsors-DC-conferences.aspx
    and Canadian Sugar Institute Collaborate/Contribute with the CDA
    http://www.fcpc.ca/…/Sandra%20Marsden%20-%20FCPC%20Spectrum…
    Credible Third Party Support Canadian Diabetes Association – Nutrition Committe
    I called the Canadian Diabetic Assn. about this, saying I did not quite understand the Sugar Institute’s statement and was wondering in which way they collaborate with the CDA. They said they would get back to me next week, the person who handles this is on holiday.

    • Joan Mercantini

      I don’t think a tax will solve the probelm. Healthy eating will. The Canada Food Guidelnes must be changed . I wrote this letter to the CDA yesterday as I was shocked to find out that the Canadian Sugar Institute supports the Dietitians of Canada
      http://www.dietitians.ca/…/Past-sponsors-DC-conferences.aspx
      and Canadian Sugar Institute Collaborate/Contribute with the CDA
      http://www.fcpc.ca/…/Sandra%20Marsden%20-%20FCPC%20Spectrum…
      Credible Third Party Support Canadian Diabetes Association – Nutrition Committe
      I called the Canadian Diabetic Assn. about this, saying I did not quite understand the Sugar Institute’s statement and was wondering in which way they collaborate with the CDA. They said they would get back to me next week, the person who handles this is on holiday

  6. Am

    Taxing the consumer seems less logical to me than putting restrictions on manufacturers. If we but limits on the amount of added sugars that are acceptable in food sold in Canada then we should limit the amount consumed. Education around healthy eating wouldn’t be as big a problem if we had less unhealthy options. I don’t believe it should be solely the responsibility of the consumer to make the best choices. I think that responsibility needs to be shared with those who regulate what food can be sold in Canada because that will show a true commitment to improving the lives of Canadians. This isn’t to say we should ban chocolate but rather to show that actual improvements are being made that don’t disadvantage Canadians, especially the low-income Canadians whose access to healthy food is often quite limited.

  7. David

    Why we continue to have products in the marketplace that harm humankind is clearly beyond comprehension. Politics, capitalism, greed…all at the expense of who we are. The only solution, the only solution, is to remove them from our midst. Let the people have their cigarettes and alcohol, and unashamedly remove the processed poisons they call food. Maybe then, maybe then, even the cigarettes and alcohol…and maybe even the illicit or prescription drugs…will become less of an issue. Imagine that!

  8. KARL PEREIRA

    If pharmacy’s are supposed to promote health and wellness. How come there are sugary drinks being sold in pharmacies. Even if individual owned pharmacies can remove them it would be a start. How can major chain such as Rexall and Shoppers Drug Mart sell Sugary Drinks next to a dispensary of drugs.

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