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When bread becomes difficult to swallow.

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6 Comments
  • Mike Gibson says:

    I feel like I’m going to asphyxiate and sometimes expel whitish phlegm. Pretty much only at lunch if I eat a sandwich or bread. It’s scary but this article has enlightened me to consider options.

  • Helen says:

    It sounds like my problem – I no longer eat sandwiches as I feel like the food is stuck in my throat & has on a few occasions made me sick. Also I am part of a family who all have allergies,

  • Dennis Budgell says:

    Hello :)
    This reaction appears similar to what I have been experiencing for a number of years, decades even. I have managed through trial and error of foods, but I have had a number of episodes that have caused me to “choke”, usually brought on by bread, cakes, and even rice. Needless to say, I avoid these foods along with eggs and certain types of alcohol (wine, craft beers, etc.) I would be curious to read more information on EoE. If anyone could suggest research that could help me understand why it develops in people, and that could provide me with some ideas on how to manage it more effectively, I would be grateful.
    Sincerely,
    Dennis Budgell

  • Julie Leighton says:

    Finally, now I know…. very scary especially if driving and eating a burger makes me choke and throw up. Dangerous . I no longer eat while driving.

  • Melissa Sanderson says:

    I think I’ve had this scary condition my whole life… very enlightening to read this article. Many thanks

  • Joshua says:

    Such a good article!

Authors

Jocelyn Jia

Contributor

Jocelyn Jia is a third year medical student at the University of Toronto.

Vishal Avinashi

Contributor

Vishal Avinashi is a pediatric gastroenterologist and Investigator at BC Children’s Hospital, and a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia.

Hin Hin Ko

Contributor

Hin Hin Ko is a gastroenterologist and Investigator at St. Paul’s Hospital and a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia.

Lianne Soller

Contributor

Lianne Soller is a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Edmond S. Chan at BC Children’s Hospital in the Division of Allergy & Immunology.

Elaine Hsu

Contributor

Elaine Hsu was previously a Research Coordinator with Dr. Edmond S. Chan at BC Children’s Hospital in the Division of Allergy & Immunology.

Edmond S. Chan

Contributor

Edmond S. Chan is a pediatric allergist & immunologist and Investigator at BC Children’s Hospital, and a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia.

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