Sandor J. Demeter

Contributor

Dr. Sandor Demeter is a Nuclear Medicine and Public Health physician and an Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba. He recently completed the Fellowship in Global Journalism program at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health – University of Toronto.

7 Contributions
by Sandor J. Demeter

Could Australia’s recent radiation scare happen in Canada?

The recent massive search in Western Australia for a highly radioactive ceramic disc that had fallen off a truck drew worldwide attention. Amazingly, the tiny capsule was found. But could a similar incident happen in Canada?

by Sandor J. Demeter

Your teeth can reveal how much radiation you’ve been exposed to

Ontario Tech scientists team with dentists to measure life-long radiation exposure in people living close to nuclear power plants.

by Sandor J. Demeter

Newfoundland and Labrador first province to impose a sugar tax to combat obesity and diabetes. Will it work?

Newfoundland and Labrador is the first Canadian province to join the international beverage sugar-tax club. This effort aims to combat the "growing and silent epidemic" of diabetes impacting more than 11.7 million Canadians.

by Sandor J. Demeter

Indigenous-led solutions counter a diabetes epidemic

Health Canada frameworks can only go so far in addressing the diabetes epidemic. But Indigenous groups have put forward community-specific solutions to address some of the key contributors to diabetes, including diet and lifestyle.

by Sandor J. Demeter

Let’s stop the bickering: Canadians are weary of finger-pointing amid the health-care crisis

Canadians love their publicly funded health care. But it is time to stop normalizing our broken health-care system. Political leaders need to quit bickering about who pays for what and get on with actually fixing the problem.

by Sandor J. Demeter

Behind the scenes: The increasingly complex – and common – radiation treatment for cancer

Radiation therapy for cancer is becoming increasingly complex, sophisticated and personalized. Behind the scenes for most patients hides an invisible team hard at work.

by Sandor J. Demeter

New drug to treat prostate cancer may be out of reach for most Canadians

A new, last-hope prostate cancer treatment has been approved by Health Canada but may be out of reach for most of the more than 4,500 men who die of the disease each year.

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