Tag: Evidence Based Medicine

Episode 12 – Rapid Fire Treatment Options for COVID-19

Welcome back Rounds Table Listeners! This week we are going back to our Rapid Fire Format to review two papers looking at new data on treatment options for patients with COVID-19. Is Remdesivir effective in the treatment of COVID-19? https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2007764 Is Lopinavir-ritonavir effective in the treatment of COVID-19? https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2001282   And for The Good Stuff….…

Episode 10 – Interview with Dr. Sholzberg on COVID coagulopathy

Welcome back Rounds Table Listeners! This week we interviewed Dr. Michelle Sholzberg to discuss coagulopathy associated with COVID-19. Dr. Sholzberg is a clinical hematologist with a focus on bleeding and is the Medical Director of the Coagulation Laboratory at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She is also the Co-Director of the Hematology-Oncology Clinical…

Episode 8 – Rapid Fire: COVID-19 Part 2

Welcome back Rounds Table Listeners! This episode we discuss two recently published papers related to COVID-19. 1.       What is the incidence and significance of cardiac injury in patients with COVID-19 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2763524 2.      The clinical course and risk factors for mortality in a multi-centre cohort of inpatients with COVID-19 https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30566-3/fulltext And for the good stuff: 1.       Calgary distillers and…

Episode 7 – Rapid Fire COVID-19

Welcome back Rounds Table Listeners! This episode, we’re focusing on 2 papers recently released related to COVID-19. 1.       Our first paper provides an overview of the clinical characteristics of a sample of patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2002032 2.       The second paper provides timely data to identify factors associated with ARDS among adults diagnosed with COVID-19.…

Decision aids: why hasn’t this proven, patient-centred practice caught on?

Decision aids

Health care has supposedly entered an era of patient involvement, where important medical decisions are shared between doctors and patients. But many believe that the reality in Canadian health care falls well short of this ideal. Complex medical decisions can prove difficult for patients, who are often faced with dizzying amounts of information about benefits and risks,…

What Canada can learn from Sweden’s health registry system

In 2007, a group of Canadian cardiologists found themselves in a unique position. New – and expensive – implantable cardiac defibrillators were being used by fewer than a dozen doctors. And the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences was offering to help them create a registry that would track outcomes for five years. Soon, they had the largest registry…

How Norway’s innovative library made high-quality health information free for everyone

If you’re looking for evidence-based health information in Canada, a lot depends on who – and where – you are. A physician in a teaching hospital? No problem. But family doctors in rural areas, nurses or physiotherapists have a much harder time accessing up to date materials. And the general public is more likely to find…

Buyer beware – no quick fix for concussion symptoms

The world is watching athletes in Sochi compete in sports such as hockey and downhill skiing. Concussion poses a risk, not only to the highly trained individuals competing in the Olympics, but also to ordinary Canadians who play sports occasionally. Concussions are the result of a blow to the head, and are the most common…

Should clinical practice guidelines consider value for money?

clinical practice guidelines cost effectiveness health care economics health care policy

In Canada, doctors’ associations regularly incorporate new evidence about medications into clinical practice guidelines that are intended to influence patient care. The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care reviews the same evidence to decide which medications it will pay for, and often comes to different conclusions. This results in doctors recommending medications which are…

Did mammography save her life?

Did Mammography Save Her Life?

Some breast cancers detected by screening mammography are cured and would have led to death had they not been detected early. Other breast cancers detected by screening can be treated just as effectively if diagnosed later, may not have needed treatment at all, or may be so advanced that treatment does not prevent death from…

Interpreting randomized trial evidence around mammography

Interpreting Randomized Trial Evidence on Mammography

The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recently released recommendations about screening for breast cancer.  These recommendations have been criticized by some because they emphasize the results of randomized trials.  This article explores the advantages and limitations of randomized trial evidence regarding screening mammography.  The recent recommendations by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive…

Presenting the benefits of mammography

Presenting the Benefits of Mammography

The results of research on screening for breast cancer with mammography can be presented in ways that make the benefits seem larger or smaller  Similarly, the benefits can be described as avoiding deaths from breast cancer or avoiding deaths from any cause Part of the debate about the benefits of screening mammography may be related…