Aging

188 articles:
by Rebekah Sibbald Samuel Thrall Larry W. Chambers

Delirium prevention: Up close and personal

Despite being the third most common cause of unintended harm as a result of medical treatment, delirium is still widely misunderstood. This is what the public, patients, and health-care workers all need to know about the condition.

by Steven Brooks

Surviving cardiac arrest should not depend on luck

Surviving sudden cardiac arrest depends largely on luck – and it shouldn’t be this way. A scientist working at Queen’s University is focused on testing new strategies and technologies to reduce our dependence on chance.

by Sandor J. Demeter

Your teeth can reveal how much radiation you’ve been exposed to

Ontario Tech scientists team with dentists to measure life-long radiation exposure in people living close to nuclear power plants.

by Clare Liddy Deanne Houghton

Is anyone listening to Canada’s caregivers?

Caregivers are essential, but they feel overwhelmed and undervalued. National and provincial strategies focusing on supporting them are needed.

by Darren Cargill

Palliative pixie dust

Just as Disney World has grown and evolved, so must palliative care. The time for Ontario to update palliative care into the 21st century may have arrived.

by Maddi Dellplain

‘Technology to help bridge the gap’: Smart homes and sensors ease caregiver burden

Smart home technology has become ubiquitous in recent years. Now researchers in Ottawa are finding ways to use this same technology to aid health-care workers, family caregivers, and allow patients to age in place.

by Stephen B. Singh Pamela Liao Joyce Cheung Jacqueline Carverhill Brian Berger

Hospice care, not hospital beds: Investing in palliative care will help solve the health-care crisis

6,000 patients in Ontario currently need an “Alternate Level of Care” (ALC). They do not need to be in hospital, but there is nowhere safe for them to go. Government investment in palliative care is a crucial part of the solution.

by Rod Parsa Rebekah Sibbald

The case for mature medical students

Many professional programs in Canada have long touted values that promote diversity of experience. But when it comes to medical schools - little consideration is made for older, more experienced candidates.

by Rebekah Sibbald Larry W. Chambers

The key to living longer and better? Dying at home

Despite our preferences, most Canadians do not have the privilege of dying at home. Although it is not possible to guarantee a good death, it is possible to reduce your risk of a bad death by thinking and talking about end-of-life.

by Katie Goldie

The gift of a better death

Canadians need universal and equitable access to high-quality palliative care. It’s time to talk about death and dying more openly and ask ourselves: What is a good death?

by Amy Hwang

Plan on ‘aging in place’? Start early and be patient

Alcina Sung and the Togethering team are compiling resources that may better educate families, designers and developers on accessibility considerations and other resources to make aging at home a reality for as long as possible.

by Catharine Chambers Nicole Naimer Maddi Dellplain ... ...

The Faces & Phases of COVID-19

The Faces/Phases Project is a portrait of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada. Through a series of data visualizations, we cover the first two years of the pandemic.

by Larry W. Chambers Rebekah Sibbald

The ABCs of combating ageism

We all need to rethink aging. Not only do our beliefs about aging play an essential role in the aging process, but changing these beliefs is not as hard as we might think.

by Maddi Dellplain ... ...

The Plan to Stay Open: Relief for our beleaguered health-care system or a move to further privatization?

Ontario’s Plan to Stay Open, a five-point strategy aimed at “health-care system stability and recovery,” has been the subject of much debate since its final release in August. We asked a panel of experts what they thought about the plan. Here's what they had to say.

by Joshua Armstrong Saskia Sivananthan

We must confront our dementia challenges now

Every year, thousands of Canadians receive the news that they, or someone they love, have been diagnosed with dementia. Finding solutions requires the commitments of all levels of government and Canadians themselves to make changes to their day-to-day lives.

by Robert Sibbald

More Beds, Better Care Act: Ethical controversy or a better use of public money?

The More Beds, Better Care Act shouldn't be considered controversial. Is it going to make a significant dent in our ALC numbers? Probably not. But that isn’t because the concept of quickly moving patients out of situations whose resources are misaligned to patient need is a bad – or unethical – idea.

by Peter Allatt Bob Parke

 A public policy dead end: The More Beds, Better Care Act

Bill 7, the More Beds, Better Care Act, is a hotbed of ethical issues that will fail to relieve our stressed hospital system. It's ethically and legally unsustainable, and as public policy - it’s a dead end.

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