Mental Health

197 articles:
by Maddi Dellplain

Groundbreaking research into ME/CFS a pandemic ‘silver lining’

ME/CFS is a misunderstood complex chronic illness affecting more than 600,000 Canadians. For decades ME/CFS patients have been left without proper medical support. But now, with the wave of new post-viral illnesses from the COVID-19 pandemic, ME/CFS patients might finally see some answers.

by Nancy Lefebre

Why social impact matters: Reflections from a nursing leader

Investing in social impact is something organizations in the health-care field are uniquely positioned to do. We need to remind people of the “why” behind what we do and consider ways we can use our considerable economic and social power to be a force for good.

by Catharine Chambers Nicole Naimer Maddi Dellplain

The Faces & Phases of COVID-19

The Faces/Phases Project is a portrait of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada. Through a series of data visualizations, we cover the first two years of the pandemic.

by Nour Al-Nasser Lydia-Joi Marshall Sophia Ikura

Trust is essential to a functioning social safety net: Lessons from the pandemic

For those who already felt disconnected from the health-care systems and policy-makers, the COVID-19 pandemic has further exacerbated lack of trust in health care and public messaging.

by Larry W. Chambers Rebekah Sibbald

The ABCs of combating ageism

We all need to rethink aging. Not only do our beliefs about aging play an essential role in the aging process, but changing these beliefs is not as hard as we might think.

by Maddi Dellplain

Move to generic methadone raises concerns

Ontario’s move away from brand name Methadose has sparked concerns the switch could negatively impact those who rely on the drug, prompting calls for more buy-in from methadone users ahead of these changes.

by Siri Chunduri Jonathan I. Mitchell Kam Tello Samuel Breau Nicholas Watters Karina Urdaneta

The urgent need for mental health-care supports

By age 40, half of all Canadians will experience mental health issues. Implementing the “quality mental health care framework” would go a long way to providing much-needed care.

by Marina Moharib

‘Thriving and flourishing’: Removing stigma and finding treatment for a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder

A diagnosis is generally helpful. But when a condition is stigmatized and there is limited access to treatment, it can become a point of tension and clinicians may shy away from it. This is the story of borderline personality disorder.

by Nicole Naimer

‘Nowhere to go’: Homelessness and mental illness create a ‘revolving door’ of admissions

Homelessness at discharge in psychiatric settings comes with significant cost to our health-care system and, more importantly, to those with lived experience. Without a provincial strategy for discharging people experiencing homelessness from hospitals and shelter beds at capacity, many are left with no where to go.

by Katherine van Kampen

Gallery’s ‘at-home apothecary’ exhibit holds a critical lens to the wellness industry

The at-home apothecary, or EXTRA STRENGTH + PAIN RELIEF, is a mixed-media body of work that highlights themes of physical ailment, addiction and mental health. It's as relevant in a semi-post-pandemic world as it was when the artist first began sketching the pieces in 2016.

by Angela Onkay Ho Lyndal Petit Kashif Pirzada Karen Shin

Ontario’s mental health laws must change to protect our most vulnerable patients

Ontario’s current mental health laws create barriers for front-line physicians to effectively treat patients experiencing psychosis.

by Justine Baek

Re-evaluating visitor restrictions

While visitor policies have undoubtedly helped prevent COVID transmission in hospitals, as we move away from a crisis response to COVID-19, caregivers and families may once again be able to support patients alongside their health-care teams.

by Rachel Lebovic

Why I talk about mental illness when stigma tells me I shouldn’t

There is stigma surrounding the illness that nearly took my life and it will be hard for people to look beyond my past. But we will never break the stigma by continuing to give into it in remaining silent.

by Eddy Lang Arnav Agarwal

Overdiagnosis: Good intentions gone bad

Overdiagnosis is a problem that's been recognized for decades, but in the last 10 years research has proven that early detection does not always mean better outcomes. Overdiagnosis can sometimes cause physical, psychological or financial harm. But there are things that both physicians and patients can do to help prevent it.

by Bayley Levy

Deadly cracks in a broken mental-health system

While struggling with any illness, it is reassuring to feel that there is a place to go for help if things deteriorate beyond your ability to handle it. This is a sense of comfort I have lost. I have been forced to face the reality of what the emergency department can provide for mental health crises – not a lot. But there's more we could do.

by Eddy Lang Atul Kapur

In support of addiction and mental health patients in emergency departments

If our health-care system claims to be equitable and considerate of patients with addiction and mental-health concerns, it has to resolve the issue of boarded mental-health patients in emergency departments, which can lead to higher overall wait times for emergency care.

by Jennifer Hulme

Long COVID – a public health crisis taking out women at the height of their lives

Long COVID symptoms now dominate my life, hopes and dreams. As soon as I realized that I wasn’t getting better after my COVID infection, I went looking for answers.

by Maddi Dellplain

The right to die: Should MAiD apply to those whose sole condition is mental illness?

With the expansion of medical assistance in dying (MAiD) to include those whose sole condition is mental illness fast approaching, we asked a panel of experts whether they felt this was a move in the right direction — and what they hope to see moving forward.

by Angela Duan

Social prescribing: An undervalued tool to deal with mental health

Treating Josh and others like him during the pandemic taught me an important lesson – individualized treatment for those dealing with a mental health crisis must go beyond psychotherapy and medications.

by Gwyneth Boone

The human cost of fighting COVID in prisons: Solitary confinement, banned for its cruelty, has made a comeback

In 2019, the Ontario Court of Appeals called solitary confinement a form of cruel and unusual punishment. Three years later, federal prisons are still placing prisoners in solitary confinement.

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