Social Determinants

371 articles:
by Maddi Dellplain

Interview with the author: Blair Bigham

Healthy Debate sat down with Dr. Blair Bigham to talk about his experience writing Death Interrupted.

by The Disability and Reproductive Health During COVID-19 Study Team

Disability and reproductive health: Examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic

To better understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the reproductive health of women, trans and non-binary people with disabilities, researchers at the University of Toronto partnered with the DisAbled Women’s Network (DAWN) of Canada to conduct the ongoing Disability and Reproductive Health during COVID-19 Study.

by Suzanne Shoush

On this Orange Shirt Day: What has changed?

Today marks our second National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. It has been two years since the death of Joyce Echaquan; 16 months since the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc community confirmed long-held knowledge that hundreds of little children were buried in unmarked graves on the grounds. Since then, the haunting reality of more than a thousand additional radar “pings,” with each ping confirming the body of a little child lying in an unmarked grave, on the very grounds of the school they were forced to attend. So much has happened . . . but what has changed?

by Maddi Dellplain

Move to generic methadone raises concerns

Ontario’s move away from brand name Methadose has sparked concerns the switch could negatively impact those who rely on the drug, prompting calls for more buy-in from methadone users ahead of these changes.

by Anjali Bhayana

Malnourishment by design

Colonial attitudes and policies, now recognized as powerful social determinants of health, have led to mass hunger and preventable diseases.

by Maddi Dellplain

Cross-country project gives patients a say in solving primary-care crisis

Dr. Tara Kiran and a team of collaborators are launching OurCare, a three-phase research project that aims to provide much-needed answers to Canada’s primary care woes. The project kicks off with a national survey of patients' experience.

by Atefeh Mohammadi Vaidhehi Veena Sanmugananthan Junayd Hussain

The Nobel Prize, and representation in science

The Nobel Prize is one of the most coveted accolades in academia, but diverse individuals are being left out as awardees. We hope that scientists from underrepresented communities also will feel as if their work will be recognized fairly.

by Nicole Naimer

‘Nowhere to go’: Homelessness and mental illness create a ‘revolving door’ of admissions

Homelessness at discharge in psychiatric settings comes with significant cost to our health-care system and, more importantly, to those with lived experience. Without a provincial strategy for discharging people experiencing homelessness from hospitals and shelter beds at capacity, many are left with no where to go.

by Maddi Dellplain

In ‘Heroin,’ author lays bare the injustice and systemic racism behind Canada’s drug laws

For International Overdose Awareness Day (Aug. 31), Healthy Debate sat down with Dr. Susan Boyd to discuss her latest book, Heroin: An Illustrated History.

by Riley Meade

Tackling racism in Canadian health care: University offers first master’s program in Black health

Black Canadians have poorer health outcomes and are less likely to obtain health-care services compared to other groups. Poverty, unemployment, racism and discrimination, increase the risk of illness and interfere with timely and unprejudiced treatment. A new University of Toronto program is working toward eliminating discrimination and its adverse effects on health care.

by Sarah Newbery James Rourke Ruth Wilson

Rural health care: How to get it right

Rural citizens are generally older, sicker and poorer than the rest of the population, and so have greater need for care if they are to achieve health outcomes equitable to the rest of the population. We have a system that is failing rural Canadians, and it must change. But what if we got it right?

by Ritika Goel

New PSA has potential, but devil is in the capitation details

The new Physician Services Agreement adds a complexity modifier to capitation-based primary care models in Ontario, which could be an important step toward equity. Done right, it could incentivize physicians to serve those who most need care and address ongoing health gaps. But the devil is in the details.

by Vivek Govardhanam

Call the ‘brown doctor’: A case for language-sensitive delivery of health care

In a multicultural city like Toronto, it only makes ethical and financial sense to provide language-sensitive care in hospitals. Without it, culturally sensitive communication is incomplete.

by Inori Roy

‘Data is powerful’: Demographic questionnaire adds transparency to Match Day

This year, the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) with the support of Dalhousie University, rolled out its pilot questionnaire to collect much-needed demographic data on residency placements across the country. Information gathered on race and Indigeneity, immigration, ability, gender, sexual orientation and household income of students could go a long way in ensuring equity among med students.

by Aruni Jayatilaka

10 paid days of sick leave. A basic right for all workers

As a provincial election nears in Ontario, the Ontario Medical Students Association joins advocates across the province calling for a comprehensive paid sick-days program that supports all workers.

by Steven (Sung Min) Cho

Improved paid sick leave, minimum wage necessary for our patients’ health

The public health order to “stay home when sick” without 10 paid sick days was impossible for countless workers. Precarious workers who perform essential, yet low-paying jobs shared the greatest burden of the pandemic. Now is the time for the government to act.

by Jennifer Hulme

Long COVID – a public health crisis taking out women at the height of their lives

Long COVID symptoms now dominate my life, hopes and dreams. As soon as I realized that I wasn’t getting better after my COVID infection, I went looking for answers.

by Maddi Dellplain

The right to die: Should MAiD apply to those whose sole condition is mental illness?

With the expansion of medical assistance in dying (MAiD) to include those whose sole condition is mental illness fast approaching, we asked a panel of experts whether they felt this was a move in the right direction — and what they hope to see moving forward.

by Negin Nia

Access to virtual care highlights urban/rural divide

The move to virtual care is leaving some communities behind. For rural Canadians, especially those in remote and Indigenous communities, there are obstacles to seeing a doctor both in person and online.

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