From battles to journeys: changing how we talk about illness and cancer


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5 comments

  1. Louis Lizotte

    Excellent article! It explains really well the reasons behind vocabulary and analogy choices related to cancer.

  2. Mihaela Nicula

    Congratulations for bring up this important topic on how to help patients relate emotionally to their illness. It is important for a clinician to know how to select these metaphors. It can be very rewarding to find the right one, especially in the context on counselling patients with a lower health literacy level. I am a geriatrician and I struggle to find motivational methaphors for my patients who suffer from dementia and their caregivers. I would like to see more research on this.

  3. Mihaela Nicula

    Congratulations for bring up this important topic on how to help patients relate emotionally to their illness. It is important for a clinician to know how to select these metaphors. It can be very rewarding to find the right one, especially in the context on counselling patients with a lower health literacy level. I am a geriatrician and I struggle to find motivational methaphors for my patients who suffer from dementia and their caregivers. I would like to see more research on this.

  4. Susan Law

    Thank you for this feature – well done! Personal experiences of illness are just that .. personal. Beware research approaches that curtail (wittingly or not) patients’ or families’ expressions of metaphors for illness, and that narrow interpretations on their behalf. See women’s stories of their experiences of breast cancer at http://www.healthexperience.ca – click on breast cancer.

  5. Kelly Creek

    Great perspective. I think it’s more about living with cancer than dying after a courageous battle from cancer. My spouse was treated for prostate cancer. After his recovery he wondered – should I say I have cancer or had cancer? A good question for sure. You are labelled and now have this disease hanging over your head like a black cloud. What do you or can you do other than live with it? It’s a state of mind now. It’s up to you how to move forward.

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