A little science is a dangerous thing - Healthy Debate
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A little science is a dangerous thing

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3 Comments
  • Richard says:

    Curiously I just finished watching the first season of Charité ( https://www.netflix.com/ca/title/80178971) The series describes the accomplishments (and disasters) of several famous German physicians (including Koch) and scientists at the prestigious Charité hospital in Berlin towards the end of the 19th century. The first season focuses on the Tuberculin debacle that Susan so decisively describes. It might be worth a watch to add some “docudramatic” expression to the cautions that Alexander Pope so eloquently espoused over 300 years ago. We see the same issues at play with COVID today.

  • Dr.Shrirama Dongre says:

    Thanks a lot for this much needed article which guides us in the right direction time of confusion,panic &’Misinformation pandemic’.

  • rick says:

    Yep, follow the money with the corollary of follow the politics.

    Why do the CDC and the Gates Foundation have financial agreements over covid vaccine creation? follow the money

    Why was HCQ so demonized as dangerous and useless the day after President Trump threw it out there? follow the money and the politics

    Integrity in research has diminished significantly – integrity in peer-reviewing has diminished significantly – it’s now about a belief and/or an agenda (pal-review).

    Very few argue or postulate with facts now, it’s more “I don’t like what you are saying about all the few facts I know about XX – so shut up!”. And the more egregious thing is the omission of facts so that the argument fits the narrative conclusively.

    We are in a difficult place right now – hopefully a few good men and women will continue to do the right thing for the right reasons – always

Authors

Nadin Abbas

Contributor

Nadin Abbas is a second-year medical student at the University of Ottawa with an interest in the role of the arts and humanities in medical education.

Susan Lamb

Contributor

Susan Lamb is a historian of medicine and holds the AMS Jason A. Hannah Chair in History of Medicine at the University of Ottawa.

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