Technology and Innovation

196 articles:
by Colin Whaley Brandon Tang

What’s on a label? This simple intervention could improve patient safety and save money

Adding reason for use to the labels of prescriptions could be an opportunity to support patient health literacy and to improve communication within the health-care team.

by Sandor J. Demeter

New drug to treat prostate cancer may be out of reach for most Canadians

A new, last-hope prostate cancer treatment has been approved by Health Canada but may be out of reach for most of the more than 4,500 men who die of the disease each year.

by Manjot Sandila Omouyi Omoike

‘Please don’t come back’: Using virtual care to prevent readmissions

In Canada, one in 11 patients is readmitted within 30 days of being discharged from hospital. But virtual care can help reduce readmissions, cut costs, and reduce pressures on the health-care system.

by Chris Hayes

The ongoing race in health care. Who will win?

In the race to change health care, there are two participants: Health-care improvement and burnout. Who will win?

by Bhargavi Duvvuri

Research into rare diseases ‘touches everyone’

Research into rare diseases can hold the key to unlocking the secrets of far more common ailments.

by Sandor Demeter

Canada flexing its nuclear muscles in medicine, energy production and nuclear waste management

Canada’s nuclear industry is experiencing a renaissance after 15 years of setbacks and stagnation. These developments could prove helpful in medicine. But issues like finding a home for high-level nuclear waste site are not without controversy.

by Anamika Mishra

‘It’s not easy to be a start-up in health care’: Family doctor’s AI tool aims to ease burnout

Artificial intelligence (AI)-based tools are being used to ease administrative burdens on family physicians in clinics across the province. But there are still a number of risks and benefits to weigh when it comes to new AI technology.

by Maddi Dellplain

The Plan to Stay Open: Relief for our beleaguered health-care system or a move to further privatization?

Ontario’s Plan to Stay Open, a five-point strategy aimed at “health-care system stability and recovery,” has been the subject of much debate since its final release in August. We asked a panel of experts what they thought about the plan. Here's what they had to say.

by Tara Kiran

Virtual care is here to stay. But what are patients’ expectations?

As we redesign a better primary care system coming out of the pandemic, we need to consider the role of virtual care and what patients will expect.

by Michelle Cohen

‘Violating Nature’s Health Laws’: How an eccentric early 20th century influencer set the stage for the COVID infodemic

Recognizing historical influences is just the start of tackling the social underpinnings of the infodemic. We must shed the legacy of the idea that a sick person ‘deserved it as a penalty for violating Nature’s health laws.

by Milena Forte

Designing virtual and physical clinical spaces to build trust

The clinical spaces that surround us are not passive; they can enhance or hinder our effectiveness as health-care providers. Research has shown the built environment can affect a number of outcomes for patients as well as improve workplace safety and satisfaction for providers.

by Atefeh Mohammadi Vaidhehi Veena Sanmugananthan Junayd Hussain

The Nobel Prize, and representation in science

The Nobel Prize is one of the most coveted accolades in academia, but diverse individuals are being left out as awardees. We hope that scientists from underrepresented communities also will feel as if their work will be recognized fairly.

by Jeffrey Mo

Hunt is on for helium; rising cost has some hospitals turning to new MRI models

The rising costs and difficulty of sourcing helium, partly because of the war in Ukraine, have led to the development of new MRI machines that use significantly less helium.

by Eddy Lang Arnav Agarwal

Overdiagnosis: Good intentions gone bad

Overdiagnosis is a problem that's been recognized for decades, but in the last 10 years research has proven that early detection does not always mean better outcomes. Overdiagnosis can sometimes cause physical, psychological or financial harm. But there are things that both physicians and patients can do to help prevent it.

by Inori Roy

National licensure, better virtual-care needed to fix system ‘close to the precipice’: incoming CMA president

Dr. Alika Lafontaine sat down with Healthy Debate to talk about the challenges facing our health-care system as it grapples with pandemic recovery.

by Negin Nia

Access to virtual care highlights urban/rural divide

The move to virtual care is leaving some communities behind. For rural Canadians, especially those in remote and Indigenous communities, there are obstacles to seeing a doctor both in person and online.

by Rashaad Bhyat

The digital revolution is upon us; how can e-prescribing help alleviate the click burden?

As we continue returning to a semblance of normalcy, it’s important we don’t lose the progress that we’ve made in safe and effective virtual care. e-Prescribing tools should continue to be a part of safer and more efficient medication management.

by Will Falk

Twenty years of talk is enough: Digital tools like e-prescribing must become a core part of our health-care system

When the pandemic started and social distancing necessitated a switch to virtual care almost overnight, our digital health-care system struggled and sometimes failed entirely. This broken system must end now. Here's how we can fix it.

by Marianne Apostolides

Digital therapeutics and the social determinants of health are on divergent pathways. Can they be reconciled?

Two significant trends in health care are at cross-purposes: the boom in digital devices that tackle diseases at the individual level, and the growing recognition of the importance of social determinants of health. Can these two trends be reconciled?

by Kirstin Weerdenburg

Children’s visits to emergency departments surge as winter looms

Pediatric emergency departments are seeing record numbers of visits since some families can’t see their family doctors or go to walk-in clinics. More patients mean longer waits, hindering care for some children with emergency conditions.

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